Human, topic and variations

Human, topic and variations

September 12 – November 15, 2020

The collective exhibition Human, topic and variations is a study of the elements of every human: dreaming, emotion, the unconscious, feelings.
All these things are beyond the control of today’s human beings, who are unable to manage these elements through logic and predefined rules even though these are the only traits that remind us of our true nature. 

“We present this exhibition equipped with the manuals of our time: statistics and graphs. These are the tools we use to observe humanity through its history. Graphs – demographic, economic, technological and more – record the dizzying progress of a thousand years of history, which over the course of only a few generations has suddenly taken off at seemingly unstoppable speed. Humanity has inhabited this planet for millennia but has now been precipitated headlong into the vertical acceleration of “progress”, retaining some of its original characteristics: dreamlife, emotion, the unconscious, and feelings.
All these things are beyond the control of today’s human beings, who are unable to manage these elements through logic and predefined rules even though these are the only traits that remind us of our true nature. The verticalisation imposed by what we call progress is reversing the paradigm of man’s belonging to nature, changing it into nature’s belonging to man. But the metamorphosis of nature from subject into
inanimate object (without a soul) implies the same fate for humanity.
This equation can be clearly read in the works of Stefano Invernizzi. His works portray the relationship between man and industrial product – in which our world is submerged – as a viscous one. Which of the two plays the role of subject, and which the object? Who is the hand and what is the treasure? Which of the two, object or man,
has the intention and which is the emanation of that intention? We are not given to know. The
proportion, definition and placement of the objects depicted by Stefano Invernizzi impose themselves on a humanity of Lilliputians, unaware of their role in the game.
Under the spotlight of the work of Constantin Migliorini we see human bodies in the foreground, naked, as refined as they are anonymous and objectified (bringing with them the sensuality of the object), fused together, on geometrical planes without perspective, with the silhouettes of other bodies in an ethereal relationship set within dreamlike worlds and auras.
A realism that is to a greater extent (Migliorini) or lesser extent (Invernizzi) academic, plays a role of contrast
, exalting the dreamlike or surrealist narratives of the work of both artists.
The sculptures of Giuseppe Tattarletti and the paintings of Alessandro Negri have a more direct, unequivocal expressive language. Negri’s masterful works, created with a strong graphic accent, have Eros at the helm, with Thanatos fluttering around him. Eroticism is clearly expressed, while nothing is conceded to complacency.
In Tattarletti’s sculptures, the roles of these two gods from mythology (at the root of existence itself) are reversed: the suffering of a neglected humanity is explicit, seemingly challenging the conflict between society and the individual, between the “normality” of the conforming masses and the solitude of the individual which is converted by that same “normality” into alienation and madness.
Between the realism of Invernizzi and Migliorini and the expressiveness of Tattarletti and Negri, we have the elegant painting of Igor De Marchi.This elegance is a synthesis of realism and expressiveness, evoking Renaissance painting in spite of its markedly contemporary character. De Marchi’s work lies between the cracks of conscious and stubborn resistance to the compact, inescapable wall of the “hypermass” and its social system. De Marchi says of his work: “I imagine a theatre stage, on which each character plays himself, with strength and fragility. The colour black, always present in De Marchi’s work, is also seen as the unconscious, throbbing with impulses of human existence from the past, sometimes removed”. 

February 2020
Francesco Falcolini